Tips to Pick the Right SD-WAN Security Architecture

Tips to Pick the Right SD-WAN Security Architecture

Enterprise Networking Mag | Tuesday, April 06, 2021

The cloud-based protection market is growing steadily, has taken off in recent years, and is primarily powered by increased usage of mobile devices and applications as part of the increasingly popular BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) trend.

FREMONT, CA: The SD-WAN will easily support the chosen network security model or the security architecture already in place. Three radically separate security architecture frameworks resolve these issues, centralized, distributed, and cloud-based architectures. Each of them tackles security issues and unique benefits. Businesses can dig into each of them below to choose the right strategy:

Cloud-Based Security: If one is looking for stability and ease of access for data and SaaS applications, consider a cloud-based network security model. With this framework, security systems live as cloud-based software instead of relying on specialized remote network security technology, and businesses benefit from automatic control and delivery capabilities.

The cloud-based protection market is growing steadily, has taken off in recent years, and is primarily powered by increased usage of mobile devices and applications as part of the increasingly popular BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) trend. This model has a lower average latency for cloud connectivity and facilitates the tracking of real-time risks. However, for this strategy to be successful, companies must ensure their cloud connections' stability and security, accept network integrations or technologies as required to streamline SaaS connectivity, and provide reliability and Quality of Experience (QoE).

Centralized Security: Many larger organizations rely on low-bandwidth, costly MPLS connections to backhaul branch traffic to a central data center or headquarters that acts as a focal point for centralized network security regulation. This centralized network management model integrates complicated, costly network protection features around a limited range of sites, helping organizations control security costs—both from the Capital Expenditure (CapEx) and Operating Expense (OpEx) point of view—and manage efficiency and security issues more effectively. However, problems must be addressed, such as the risk of significant server malfunctions, higher average latency for cloud and SaaS connectivity, and difficulties in scaling up the WAN for bandwidth-intensive applications.

Distributed Security: At the other end of the continuum, if the company's goals are based on lower average latency, a distributed internet connection model could be the route to follow. This network management strategy is distributed around various branch areas.

However, this will make network protection much more expensive to deploy and more challenging to maintain. For example, deploying and managing advanced next-generation firewall (NGFW) functionality at several different locations will quickly add up. Besides, this distributed model has its own collection of stability, QoE, and reliability issues. An occurrence may be caused by a lapse in a single department, ensuring that adequate threat detection skills are a must for this strategy. For most branch implementations, a costly, advanced next-generation firewall is overkill for what is required. For most installations, the standard SD-WAN firewall is more than adequate.

Check out: Top Web Security Solution Companies

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