Migrating from Traditional Network to SDN

Migrating from Traditional Network to SDN

Enterprise Networking Mag | Saturday, October 16, 2021

When a business has successfully migrated even a small portion of the network to SDN, it can assess how effective the switch was by comparing metrics like efficiency and operating costs between the new SDN and the old legacy network.

FREMONT, CA: A Software-Defined Network (SDN) is a network that is managed by a single entity or software that runs on all network hardware. The data plane and control plane are separated in an SDN, and control is placed in the application layer rather than the network layer. It has several advantages over a conventional network, including lower costs, improved security, greater flexibility, easier configuration, and vendor lock-in prevention. Below is a general overview of the benefits and challenges of moving to an SDN.

Preparation

IT administrators should accept SDN's benefits over a conventional network for an enterprise to transition to a software-defined network successfully. Understanding OpenFlow, SDN controllers, and how to configure devices to communicate with the controller would make the change easier.

Pre-Migration

Examining the migration use cases of large corporations who have already made the switch to SDN will provide insight into the complexities of making the switch. Network outages, destruction of vital network equipment, and other issues are all possible problems. A crucial step in this process is to think about the security implications of switching to SDN. The best way to ensure security and redundancy is to provide a physically decentralized yet logically centralized controller (also known as a single point of control).

Migration

One must consider the various vendors that provide the software and support required to transition from a conventional network. There is a range of open-source and enterprise software providers to pick from. Choosing the right vendor would be determined by the type of network specifications one has and the budget they have set aside for this move. Starting small, the transformation process can then be scaled up to the organization's network size. Shifting the whole network would increase the likelihood of anything going wrong, requiring more time and resources.

Post-Migration (Post-Migration)

When a business has successfully migrated even a small portion of the network to SDN, it can assess how effective the switch was by comparing metrics like efficiency and operating costs between the new SDN and the old legacy network. In the improbable event that SDN is not appropriate for the company, having a rollback plan is also needed.

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