Fiber Optic Cables: What are They Used For?

Fiber Optic Cables: What are They Used For?

Lester D'Souza, Enterprise Networking Mag | Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Fiber Optic Cables: What are They Used For? Fiber optic cables, in comparison to copper-wired connections, can readily carry data over a much larger distance in less time than a wired cable since they have higher bandwidth.

FREMONT, CA: Fiber optic cables (also called optical fiber cables) are network cables that comprise numerous strands of small glass fibers called optical fibers that are kept well-insulated within the cable's body. These cables are created for long-distance, high-performance data networking, and telecommunications applications. Signals are delivered over these links by firing light pulses through optical fibers.

Fiber optic cables, in comparison to copper-wired connections, can readily carry data over a much larger distance in less time than a wired cable since they have higher bandwidth. Fiber optic cable is far more dependable than any other cable for data transmission. Due to their great reliability has a cheaper maintenance cost than copper-wired connections, despite their higher initial cost.

These cables have high heat resistance and hence can keep themselves relatively cool. Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) do not impact optical fiber lines since they do not transport electrical charge (they utilize light instead). This means that data can pass through the line without being distorted or disrupted, and thus no wire connectors are required.

Certain people, especially those who are acclimated to normal cabling systems or have no knowledge of the cables, may find purchasing and understanding the distinctions between optical fiber cables to be quite difficult. However, once learned about the advantages of fiber optic cable, one will not be able to stop themselves from purchasing a more reliable networking and telecommunication solution.

A fiber optic cable has three main components including:

Core: Starting with the core, which is either glass or plastic, it is the area where light transmission happens in the fiber. More light will be transmitted within the wire if the core is large.

Cladding: It is utilized to provide a reflection within the cable's core, which aids in transmitting light waves through the fiber.

Coating: Like any other coating, it is applied in multi-layers to cables to help preserve the fiber's strength, absorb shock, and provide further fiber protection.

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