Fiber Optic Cable: Working and Advantages

Fiber Optic Cable: Working and Advantages

Enterprise Networking Mag | Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Fiber Optic Cable: Working and AdvantagesFiber optics allow for greater capacity. The amount of network bandwidth carried by a fiber cable easily outnumbers that of a copper cable of comparable thickness.

FREMONT, CA: A fiber optic cable is a kind of network cable made up of strands of glass fibers enclosed in an insulated casing. They are made for long-distance, high-performance data networking, and telecommunications applications. Additionally, fiber-optic lines have a higher bandwidth than conventional cables and can carry data across long distances. Much of the world's internet, telephone services, and cable television are supported by fiber-optic connections.

How Fiber Optic Cables Work

Each slightly thicker than a human hair, one or more strands of glass make up a fiber optic cable. The core is the part of each strand that offers a path for light to travel through. The core is encased in cladding, a layer of glass that reflects light inward to stop signal loss and allow light to pass via bends in the cable.

Single-mode and multi-mode optical fiber cables are the two most common varieties. Single-mode optical fiber cables generate light using fragile glass strands and a laser, whereas multi-mode optical fiber cables use LEDs. Wave Division Multiplexing (WDM) techniques are commonly used in single-mode optical fiber networks to maximize the volume of data traffic that the strand can transfer. WDM permits light of many wavelengths to be combined (multiplexed) and then separated (de-multiplexed), allowing multiple communication streams to be transmitted through a single light pulse.

Advantages of Fiber Optic Cables

Compared to long-distance copper cabling, fiber cables have various advantages.

Fiber optics allow for greater capacity. The amount of network bandwidth carried by a fiber cable easily outnumbers that of a copper cable of comparable thickness. Fiber lines with speeds of 10 Gigabits per second, 40 Gigabits per second, and 100 Gigabits per second are commonplace.

The requirement for signal boosters is reduced because light can travel considerably greater distances over a fiber line without losing its strength.

A fiber optic cable is less sensitive to interference. To protect a copper network cable from electromagnetic interference, it must be shielded. While this shielding is beneficial, it is insufficient to avoid interference when multiple wires are tied together nearby. Most of these issues are avoided thanks to the physical features of fiber optic cables.

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